In his homily, Archbishop Blair reflected on the day’s memorial of St. Charles Borromeo and read a description of the saint by Bishop Antonio Seneca of Anagni, Italy, who had lived in the same house with him.

St. Charles, the archbishop read, was “vigilant in rooting out vice, benevolent in correction, just in judgment, loving in punishment, patient of human weakness, quick to avenge disobedience, his justice was united with kindness, his severity with gentleness and peace. He was a diligent guardian of wholesome discipline both in priests and people.”

Archbishop Blair said that the Italian bishop’s description of the saint “took place in a church that had seemed to be failing, really failing.”

The Liturgy is sacred and sacramental.  It is also a public, communal celebration in accordance with the entire Church, a “sacrament of unity”.  It is not a private act of the priest in which he is the celebrant and we are merely observers. We are active participants in the Mass. When abuses occur, everyone – the priest, the congregation, and the entire unity of the Church – is harmed.